The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

You know the saying “content is king,” right?

Well, there’s a new king in town, and its name is longform content.

Like you, I was skeptical about longform content at first. “Nobody wants to read 4,000 words,” I thought.

I was dead wrong.

Because longform content rocks. It seems intimidating at first, but the benefits are insane.

Need proof? Back in 2012, I ran an A/B test on my site Crazy Egg. I tested the regular homepage against a shorter version. And the longer version converted 30% higher than the short version.

image02

Longform worked better in 2012, and it still works better today.

Need more proof? Longform blog posts get more social shares and have a higher average Google rank.

Convinced? Awesome! Now onto the good stuff—creating the content that converts.

For most of us, creating the content is usually the hard part. If you’re used to writing 400-word blog posts, writing 4,000+ seems impossible. But it’s totally possible. And I’ll show you how.

Look no further: This is the ultimate blueprint to creating a high-converting longform blog post.

1. Know your audience

You will get absolutely nowhere if you don’t consider your audience first and foremost.

It seems obvious, right? But many bloggers get this wrong. They post irrelevant content and then scratch their heads, wondering why the content didn’t do well.

Even if you put out awesome content, it’ll be worthless if your readers don’t love it. You need to find out what your readers want and make it happen.

But how do you get the scoop on your readers?

One of the best ways to get to know your readers is by surveying them. You can send out a mass survey or schedule calls with a few readers to find out exactly what your audience wants.

Next, check out your comments section. Read through each comment, and really listen to what your readers have to say. You’ll likely find that certain types of posts tend to have more comments.

And don’t forget to check your social metrics. Which articles have been shared or retweeted?

Last but not least, I’ll share one of my favorite tools for getting into your readers’ minds: Google Analytics.

image04

Google Analytics (GA) can reveal a lot about your readers. You can find out where your readers are from and what their interests are. Every blogger needs to know and use GA.

2. Choose relevant ideas

Once you’ve understood your readers’ needs, you have to meet those needs with your content. And that means coming up with relevant ideas.

Here’s the catch: Coming up with ideas is hard. You want something fresh that will excite your readers, but it’s all been done before, right?

Don’t worry—it’s easier than it seems.

First, take a look at the data you’ve collected from your readers. What kinds of topics are most popular with them? That’s the ballpark you want to be in.

Let’s say you have a fitness blog and you see that articles about food get the most attention. That’s your starting point. From there, you can narrow it down.

For example, if GA Interests tells you that your readers are interested in apartment living, you might write an article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors.” You’re delivering exactly what your readers want.

But there are tons of ways to get ideas. One time-tested trick is to use BuzzSumo to find trending articles. Let’s apply that to our example of apartment workouts:

image08

Now you’ve got some insight into what your competitors are doing and what’s working for them.

3. Make the content crazy good

You knew going into this that the actual content of your blog posts is important.

And when you’re dealing with longform posts, the quality of the content will make or break the experience.

If you can’t hook your readers and keep them interested, you’ll lose them because no one’s going to read thousands of words if the content is boring them to tears.

How do you keep your readers entertained that long?

There’s one trick to this: Strive to provide enormous value with every word you write.

If you’re constantly aiming at providing value, your writing will be more targeted. And that’s always a good thing.

(It also wouldn’t hurt to brush up on your copywriting skills.)

I’ll be the first to admit that you can focus on providing value and still struggle with writing great content.

Thankfully, there are other techniques you can use:

Aim to use short paragraphs, subheadings, and lots of images. This will help readers move through the post more quickly, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finish reading.

Check out this post from Buffer:

image05

Subheadings are particularly important for longform content. If your readers are scrolling through your post and see paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, they’ll get tired. Fast.

Make sure your readers always know where they are in your post. Use subheadings as mile markers to remind your readers of the topic at hand.

And you absolutely have to include research. Your readers want to be sure that what you’re saying is backed by data. Posts that include real-life examples and case studies perform better than data-free posts.

Don’t skip over this step! Your article content plays a crucial role in conversion. If your content doesn’t wow people, do you think they’ll want to give you their emails? (Spoiler alert: they won’t.)

4. Offer something special

If you’ve written a spectacular longform blog post, you’ll hook your readers. But it doesn’t end there: you have to give them somewhere to go next.

Don’t get me wrong—there’s a ton of longform content that performs extremely well without offering anything. (Quick Sprout’s Advanced Guide to Content Marketing is just one example.)

But we’re talking about writing high-converting longform blog posts. And while you can get good conversion rates without offering a gift, they won’t be as good.

Think about it. Your first-time readers just finished your 3,000-word post. They loved it, and they want more. If they see a free offer from you, you can bet they’ll take it.

That’s because once you’ve built up authority with your audience, you’re in the position to offer a trade: something extremely valuable for nothing more than an email address. It’s a win-win.

This technique—giving away something on a blog post—is called a content upgrade. Your offer raises the bar and gives readers something even better than the blog post itself.

Brian Dean from Backlinko is a huge fan of content upgrades. In fact, he was one of the pioneers of the content upgrade approach.

He even uses a content upgrade on his post about content upgrades:

image00

See what he’s doing? He’s offering his readers something valuable that builds on the information in the blog post. In this case, it’s a checklist.

When Brian implemented content upgrades, he got an unbelievable 785% in conversions. (Nope, that’s not a typo.)

That’s the power of the content upgrade.

But you need to create the perfect content upgrade. It needs to be relevant, valuable, and helpful.

This is where all that data we talked about earlier comes in. Remember that apartment workout example we used? Our hypothetical fitness blog has readers who are also interested in apartment living (according to GA).

Content upgrades let you go a step further. An article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors” is good, but offering a bonus infographic showing the five workouts, step by step, is even better.

Here’s another great example from Bryan Harris at Videofruit. I love this content upgrade because it’s so relevant.

Here’s the article:

image06

It’s already valuable, but then Bryan ends the article with this:

image03

Are you kidding me? Templates and source code? That’s a one-two punch that creates a humongous amount of additional value.

As you can see, content upgrades work best when they’re super relevant to the topic at hand. Give your readers actionable advice they can use today.

5. Share it

I see that sometimes people focus on the “content” part of content marketing too much.

But your awesome blog post won’t do anything if it’s sitting on your site collecting dust. It needs to be shared.

The first step is to promote the article on all your social networks. (Here are some of my favorite tools for getting more social shares.)

But you don’t have to stop there. You can find influencers in your niche and reach out to them with your article.

A popular method of reaching out to blogs is to find broken links, alert the blog owners, and nicely ask them to share your article. Brian Dean calls this the “Moving Man Method.”

This worked extremely well for Backlinko reader Richard Marriot, who saw a 348% traffic increase in a week. He sent out emails like this:

image01

And this was the result:

image07

This isn’t hot air—this is stuff that works for real people. And it’ll work for you too.

Conclusion

If you do it right, longform blog posts can become one of the highest converting parts of your site.

But that requires paying serious attention to it. You can’t stop blogging, and you can’t let the quality of your posts go down.

That said, if you put in the work, you’ll see your conversion rates soar. I know that because that’s what happened to me and tons of other bloggers.

People love longform content when it’s super valuable to them.

So, go out there and create longform blog posts that will blow your readers away.

What are your favorite tricks for creating awesome longform blog posts?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post-3/
via My Media Pal New York

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

You know the saying “content is king,” right?

Well, there’s a new king in town, and its name is longform content.

Like you, I was skeptical about longform content at first. “Nobody wants to read 4,000 words,” I thought.

I was dead wrong.

Because longform content rocks. It seems intimidating at first, but the benefits are insane.

Need proof? Back in 2012, I ran an A/B test on my site Crazy Egg. I tested the regular homepage against a shorter version. And the longer version converted 30% higher than the short version.

image02

Longform worked better in 2012, and it still works better today.

Need more proof? Longform blog posts get more social shares and have a higher average Google rank.

Convinced? Awesome! Now onto the good stuff—creating the content that converts.

For most of us, creating the content is usually the hard part. If you’re used to writing 400-word blog posts, writing 4,000+ seems impossible. But it’s totally possible. And I’ll show you how.

Look no further: This is the ultimate blueprint to creating a high-converting longform blog post.

1. Know your audience

You will get absolutely nowhere if you don’t consider your audience first and foremost.

It seems obvious, right? But many bloggers get this wrong. They post irrelevant content and then scratch their heads, wondering why the content didn’t do well.

Even if you put out awesome content, it’ll be worthless if your readers don’t love it. You need to find out what your readers want and make it happen.

But how do you get the scoop on your readers?

One of the best ways to get to know your readers is by surveying them. You can send out a mass survey or schedule calls with a few readers to find out exactly what your audience wants.

Next, check out your comments section. Read through each comment, and really listen to what your readers have to say. You’ll likely find that certain types of posts tend to have more comments.

And don’t forget to check your social metrics. Which articles have been shared or retweeted?

Last but not least, I’ll share one of my favorite tools for getting into your readers’ minds: Google Analytics.

image04

Google Analytics (GA) can reveal a lot about your readers. You can find out where your readers are from and what their interests are. Every blogger needs to know and use GA.

2. Choose relevant ideas

Once you’ve understood your readers’ needs, you have to meet those needs with your content. And that means coming up with relevant ideas.

Here’s the catch: Coming up with ideas is hard. You want something fresh that will excite your readers, but it’s all been done before, right?

Don’t worry—it’s easier than it seems.

First, take a look at the data you’ve collected from your readers. What kinds of topics are most popular with them? That’s the ballpark you want to be in.

Let’s say you have a fitness blog and you see that articles about food get the most attention. That’s your starting point. From there, you can narrow it down.

For example, if GA Interests tells you that your readers are interested in apartment living, you might write an article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors.” You’re delivering exactly what your readers want.

But there are tons of ways to get ideas. One time-tested trick is to use BuzzSumo to find trending articles. Let’s apply that to our example of apartment workouts:

image08

Now you’ve got some insight into what your competitors are doing and what’s working for them.

3. Make the content crazy good

You knew going into this that the actual content of your blog posts is important.

And when you’re dealing with longform posts, the quality of the content will make or break the experience.

If you can’t hook your readers and keep them interested, you’ll lose them because no one’s going to read thousands of words if the content is boring them to tears.

How do you keep your readers entertained that long?

There’s one trick to this: Strive to provide enormous value with every word you write.

If you’re constantly aiming at providing value, your writing will be more targeted. And that’s always a good thing.

(It also wouldn’t hurt to brush up on your copywriting skills.)

I’ll be the first to admit that you can focus on providing value and still struggle with writing great content.

Thankfully, there are other techniques you can use:

Aim to use short paragraphs, subheadings, and lots of images. This will help readers move through the post more quickly, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finish reading.

Check out this post from Buffer:

image05

Subheadings are particularly important for longform content. If your readers are scrolling through your post and see paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, they’ll get tired. Fast.

Make sure your readers always know where they are in your post. Use subheadings as mile markers to remind your readers of the topic at hand.

And you absolutely have to include research. Your readers want to be sure that what you’re saying is backed by data. Posts that include real-life examples and case studies perform better than data-free posts.

Don’t skip over this step! Your article content plays a crucial role in conversion. If your content doesn’t wow people, do you think they’ll want to give you their emails? (Spoiler alert: they won’t.)

4. Offer something special

If you’ve written a spectacular longform blog post, you’ll hook your readers. But it doesn’t end there: you have to give them somewhere to go next.

Don’t get me wrong—there’s a ton of longform content that performs extremely well without offering anything. (Quick Sprout’s Advanced Guide to Content Marketing is just one example.)

But we’re talking about writing high-converting longform blog posts. And while you can get good conversion rates without offering a gift, they won’t be as good.

Think about it. Your first-time readers just finished your 3,000-word post. They loved it, and they want more. If they see a free offer from you, you can bet they’ll take it.

That’s because once you’ve built up authority with your audience, you’re in the position to offer a trade: something extremely valuable for nothing more than an email address. It’s a win-win.

This technique—giving away something on a blog post—is called a content upgrade. Your offer raises the bar and gives readers something even better than the blog post itself.

Brian Dean from Backlinko is a huge fan of content upgrades. In fact, he was one of the pioneers of the content upgrade approach.

He even uses a content upgrade on his post about content upgrades:

image00

See what he’s doing? He’s offering his readers something valuable that builds on the information in the blog post. In this case, it’s a checklist.

When Brian implemented content upgrades, he got an unbelievable 785% in conversions. (Nope, that’s not a typo.)

That’s the power of the content upgrade.

But you need to create the perfect content upgrade. It needs to be relevant, valuable, and helpful.

This is where all that data we talked about earlier comes in. Remember that apartment workout example we used? Our hypothetical fitness blog has readers who are also interested in apartment living (according to GA).

Content upgrades let you go a step further. An article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors” is good, but offering a bonus infographic showing the five workouts, step by step, is even better.

Here’s another great example from Bryan Harris at Videofruit. I love this content upgrade because it’s so relevant.

Here’s the article:

image06

It’s already valuable, but then Bryan ends the article with this:

image03

Are you kidding me? Templates and source code? That’s a one-two punch that creates a humongous amount of additional value.

As you can see, content upgrades work best when they’re super relevant to the topic at hand. Give your readers actionable advice they can use today.

5. Share it

I see that sometimes people focus on the “content” part of content marketing too much.

But your awesome blog post won’t do anything if it’s sitting on your site collecting dust. It needs to be shared.

The first step is to promote the article on all your social networks. (Here are some of my favorite tools for getting more social shares.)

But you don’t have to stop there. You can find influencers in your niche and reach out to them with your article.

A popular method of reaching out to blogs is to find broken links, alert the blog owners, and nicely ask them to share your article. Brian Dean calls this the “Moving Man Method.”

This worked extremely well for Backlinko reader Richard Marriot, who saw a 348% traffic increase in a week. He sent out emails like this:

image01

And this was the result:

image07

This isn’t hot air—this is stuff that works for real people. And it’ll work for you too.

Conclusion

If you do it right, longform blog posts can become one of the highest converting parts of your site.

But that requires paying serious attention to it. You can’t stop blogging, and you can’t let the quality of your posts go down.

That said, if you put in the work, you’ll see your conversion rates soar. I know that because that’s what happened to me and tons of other bloggers.

People love longform content when it’s super valuable to them.

So, go out there and create longform blog posts that will blow your readers away.

What are your favorite tricks for creating awesome longform blog posts?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post-2/
via My Media Pal New York

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

You know the saying “content is king,” right?

Well, there’s a new king in town, and its name is longform content.

Like you, I was skeptical about longform content at first. “Nobody wants to read 4,000 words,” I thought.

I was dead wrong.

Because longform content rocks. It seems intimidating at first, but the benefits are insane.

Need proof? Back in 2012, I ran an A/B test on my site Crazy Egg. I tested the regular homepage against a shorter version. And the longer version converted 30% higher than the short version.

image02

Longform worked better in 2012, and it still works better today.

Need more proof? Longform blog posts get more social shares and have a higher average Google rank.

Convinced? Awesome! Now onto the good stuff—creating the content that converts.

For most of us, creating the content is usually the hard part. If you’re used to writing 400-word blog posts, writing 4,000+ seems impossible. But it’s totally possible. And I’ll show you how.

Look no further: This is the ultimate blueprint to creating a high-converting longform blog post.

1. Know your audience

You will get absolutely nowhere if you don’t consider your audience first and foremost.

It seems obvious, right? But many bloggers get this wrong. They post irrelevant content and then scratch their heads, wondering why the content didn’t do well.

Even if you put out awesome content, it’ll be worthless if your readers don’t love it. You need to find out what your readers want and make it happen.

But how do you get the scoop on your readers?

One of the best ways to get to know your readers is by surveying them. You can send out a mass survey or schedule calls with a few readers to find out exactly what your audience wants.

Next, check out your comments section. Read through each comment, and really listen to what your readers have to say. You’ll likely find that certain types of posts tend to have more comments.

And don’t forget to check your social metrics. Which articles have been shared or retweeted?

Last but not least, I’ll share one of my favorite tools for getting into your readers’ minds: Google Analytics.

image04

Google Analytics (GA) can reveal a lot about your readers. You can find out where your readers are from and what their interests are. Every blogger needs to know and use GA.

2. Choose relevant ideas

Once you’ve understood your readers’ needs, you have to meet those needs with your content. And that means coming up with relevant ideas.

Here’s the catch: Coming up with ideas is hard. You want something fresh that will excite your readers, but it’s all been done before, right?

Don’t worry—it’s easier than it seems.

First, take a look at the data you’ve collected from your readers. What kinds of topics are most popular with them? That’s the ballpark you want to be in.

Let’s say you have a fitness blog and you see that articles about food get the most attention. That’s your starting point. From there, you can narrow it down.

For example, if GA Interests tells you that your readers are interested in apartment living, you might write an article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors.” You’re delivering exactly what your readers want.

But there are tons of ways to get ideas. One time-tested trick is to use BuzzSumo to find trending articles. Let’s apply that to our example of apartment workouts:

image08

Now you’ve got some insight into what your competitors are doing and what’s working for them.

3. Make the content crazy good

You knew going into this that the actual content of your blog posts is important.

And when you’re dealing with longform posts, the quality of the content will make or break the experience.

If you can’t hook your readers and keep them interested, you’ll lose them because no one’s going to read thousands of words if the content is boring them to tears.

How do you keep your readers entertained that long?

There’s one trick to this: Strive to provide enormous value with every word you write.

If you’re constantly aiming at providing value, your writing will be more targeted. And that’s always a good thing.

(It also wouldn’t hurt to brush up on your copywriting skills.)

I’ll be the first to admit that you can focus on providing value and still struggle with writing great content.

Thankfully, there are other techniques you can use:

Aim to use short paragraphs, subheadings, and lots of images. This will help readers move through the post more quickly, increasing the likelihood that they’ll finish reading.

Check out this post from Buffer:

image05

Subheadings are particularly important for longform content. If your readers are scrolling through your post and see paragraph after paragraph after paragraph, they’ll get tired. Fast.

Make sure your readers always know where they are in your post. Use subheadings as mile markers to remind your readers of the topic at hand.

And you absolutely have to include research. Your readers want to be sure that what you’re saying is backed by data. Posts that include real-life examples and case studies perform better than data-free posts.

Don’t skip over this step! Your article content plays a crucial role in conversion. If your content doesn’t wow people, do you think they’ll want to give you their emails? (Spoiler alert: they won’t.)

4. Offer something special

If you’ve written a spectacular longform blog post, you’ll hook your readers. But it doesn’t end there: you have to give them somewhere to go next.

Don’t get me wrong—there’s a ton of longform content that performs extremely well without offering anything. (Quick Sprout’s Advanced Guide to Content Marketing is just one example.)

But we’re talking about writing high-converting longform blog posts. And while you can get good conversion rates without offering a gift, they won’t be as good.

Think about it. Your first-time readers just finished your 3,000-word post. They loved it, and they want more. If they see a free offer from you, you can bet they’ll take it.

That’s because once you’ve built up authority with your audience, you’re in the position to offer a trade: something extremely valuable for nothing more than an email address. It’s a win-win.

This technique—giving away something on a blog post—is called a content upgrade. Your offer raises the bar and gives readers something even better than the blog post itself.

Brian Dean from Backlinko is a huge fan of content upgrades. In fact, he was one of the pioneers of the content upgrade approach.

He even uses a content upgrade on his post about content upgrades:

image00

See what he’s doing? He’s offering his readers something valuable that builds on the information in the blog post. In this case, it’s a checklist.

When Brian implemented content upgrades, he got an unbelievable 785% in conversions. (Nope, that’s not a typo.)

That’s the power of the content upgrade.

But you need to create the perfect content upgrade. It needs to be relevant, valuable, and helpful.

This is where all that data we talked about earlier comes in. Remember that apartment workout example we used? Our hypothetical fitness blog has readers who are also interested in apartment living (according to GA).

Content upgrades let you go a step further. An article called “5 Apartment Workouts That Won’t Wake the Neighbors” is good, but offering a bonus infographic showing the five workouts, step by step, is even better.

Here’s another great example from Bryan Harris at Videofruit. I love this content upgrade because it’s so relevant.

Here’s the article:

image06

It’s already valuable, but then Bryan ends the article with this:

image03

Are you kidding me? Templates and source code? That’s a one-two punch that creates a humongous amount of additional value.

As you can see, content upgrades work best when they’re super relevant to the topic at hand. Give your readers actionable advice they can use today.

5. Share it

I see that sometimes people focus on the “content” part of content marketing too much.

But your awesome blog post won’t do anything if it’s sitting on your site collecting dust. It needs to be shared.

The first step is to promote the article on all your social networks. (Here are some of my favorite tools for getting more social shares.)

But you don’t have to stop there. You can find influencers in your niche and reach out to them with your article.

A popular method of reaching out to blogs is to find broken links, alert the blog owners, and nicely ask them to share your article. Brian Dean calls this the “Moving Man Method.”

This worked extremely well for Backlinko reader Richard Marriot, who saw a 348% traffic increase in a week. He sent out emails like this:

image01

And this was the result:

image07

This isn’t hot air—this is stuff that works for real people. And it’ll work for you too.

Conclusion

If you do it right, longform blog posts can become one of the highest converting parts of your site.

But that requires paying serious attention to it. You can’t stop blogging, and you can’t let the quality of your posts go down.

That said, if you put in the work, you’ll see your conversion rates soar. I know that because that’s what happened to me and tons of other bloggers.

People love longform content when it’s super valuable to them.

So, go out there and create longform blog posts that will blow your readers away.

What are your favorite tricks for creating awesome longform blog posts?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/the-ultimate-blueprint-for-a-high-converting-longform-blog-post/
via My Media Pal New York

The Ultimate Blueprint for a High-Converting Longform Blog Post

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

I’ll let you in on a little marketing secret.

In the grand scheme of things, building massive amounts of traffic doesn’t really matter. What matters is converting that traffic.

Everyone talks about building traffic. That’s fine, but it’s not the end of the story. If you don’t convert your traffic, building it is pointless.

Building traffic is like building a shopping mall. You can easily get people to come through the doors, but if you have only a few lackluster stores, none of those people will turn into customers. You have to give them a reason to stay.

I’ve seen tons of sites fail miserably because they didn’t convert their traffic. A site can have the best idea in the world, but if it doesn’t focus on conversion, it’ll flop.

Funnily enough, that’s what happened to me with my first website experience.

The first site I ever built was a job board called Advice Monkey. I spent over $5,000 to create it and hired three lousy marketing firms. In the end, I learned how to market it myself, but the site still failed because it wasn’t set up to take payments.

Had I spent less time marketing and more time optimizing the site for conversions, the site would have done much better. Sure, I probably wouldn’t have made millions, but I would’ve converted more of my traffic and made more than $0.

Take a lesson from me: don’t worry much about getting people through the doors while forgetting to build the stores.

Here’s how to take all that traffic you worked so hard to build and successfully convert it.

Getting the right mindset

I firmly believe that conversion is an attitude, not just an action. It takes focus and dedication. You have to internalize your goals until they’re second nature.

I realize this sounds a little philosophical, but stay with me. You need to see conversion as more than just a bunch of numbers. Why? If you become obsessed with converting, you’ll fail.

Here’s an example. Say you’re hyper-focused on converting. You include a few popups and some social buttons, and before long, your site looks like this:

image04

Okay, it’s probably not that bad. But you get the idea.

It’s easy to go overboard, and I get that. But as Social Triggers’s Derek Halpern points out, going too far can actually become your conversion rate’s worst enemy.

You should definitely focus on conversion, but don’t get a death grip on it. Conversion is a long-term strategy, not a short-term win.

Now that you’ve understood the conversion mindset, let’s take a look at how to convert all your traffic.

Publish the right content

If I had to pick a favorite form of marketing, it’d be content marketing.

Great content is wildly powerful. The converse is true too: horrible content is wildly destructive.

In fact, your blog can (and will) fail if you get the content wrong. If you create too much content, you’ll fail. If you create content that’s not relevant to your readers, you’ll fail.

So it’s imperative you get the content right.

First, you have to decide on the type of content you’ll provide. There are many options to choose from: blog posts, webinars, and podcasts, to name a few.

How do you know which type of content is right for you? You have to know your audience. I know my readers are looking for thorough guides, and that’s one of the many reasons I use blog posts.

On the other hand, there are people like Tim Ferriss who use podcasts as their medium of choice.

image02

Tim knows his audience loves interviews with experts, and that’s what he gives them.

The lesson: Study your audience until you know them as well as you know your friends. Find out what type of content they respond to the most.

You also have to get the length right. I’ve found that longform content works best. You might be surprised to know that 3000+ word blog posts get more traffic than shorter posts.

Make conversion easy (but not annoying)

If you want people to convert, you need to make that process easy. If your readers love your content but can’t find an easy way to sign up for your list or buy your product, you’ll lose out.

There are a few elements you have to get right if you want to boost your conversion rate:

1. Make an irresistible offer

First things first: If your offer itself doesn’t amaze your readers, you’ll get zero conversions.

To create an irresistible offer, you have to know what your readers want. Delve into your psychographics to find out what drives your audience and why they behave the way they do.

SumoMe’s blog post called “The Definitive Guide to Content Upgrades” adds a sweet offer:

image05

Everyone who’s reading this post wants to learn more about content upgrades, so SumoMe offers a free e-book. It’s specific, relevant, and valuable.

On the other hand, if your offer is not specific, relevant, or valuable, your readers will have no reason to take you up on it. Don’t beat around the bush with general offers like a cheat sheet on being a better marketer. Your offer should be targeted specifically to your readers.

When you’re working on creating an irresistible offer, make sure it’s specific, relevant, and valuable. Your offers build the foundation on which you’ll build your conversion.

2. CTAs (calls-to-action)

If your CTAs are boring, your conversion rate will be low.

One of the best ways to write a great CTA is to be specific. “Buy now” could refer to anything, but “download your free e-book” reminds the reader what they’re getting.

Your CTA needs copy that’s exciting. It should feel like you’re inviting the reader on an adventure. It should not feel like you’re selling something.

Optimizely uses a straightforward and effective CTA:

image01

There’s no hard sell here. It’s an invitation to test out the software free. Plus, it’s a breeze to fill out.

Design matters too. Your CTA needs to be highly visible so people can find it and click it. It’s so simple, right? But many blogs get this wrong.

Brian Dean from Backlinko uses a yellow box for his CTAs:

image03

The yellow box works because your eye is naturally drawn to it. For Brian, that means higher conversion rates.

Find out what your yellow box is. Don’t forget to A/B test to figure out what’s working the best (and what you should ax).

Put in the time and effort to create an eye-catching CTA that engages your readers, and you’ll be rewarded.

3. Popups

Quiz time: How are popups like Justin Beiber?

As Hunter Boyle of Aweber puts it,

You either love ‘em, or hate ‘em, but lately you see ‘em everywhere—because they still pull in big crowds.

You might find popups annoying, but they work wonders. We successfully used popups on Kissmetrics to double our conversion rate.

Popups play a vital role in converting your traffic, but you shouldn’t go overboard. By tastefully using popups, you can skyrocket your conversion rate.

First, you need to decide which type(s) of popups to use. The days of random popups are gone. Instead, opt for triggered popups.

Let’s talk about two of my favorite types of popups:

  1. exit intent overlays
  2. scroll-triggered scrollboxes.

You’re probably familiar with exit intent popups that appear when your mouse moves to close the tab. An exit intent overlay is a full-screen popup that appears when a user gets ready to leave the site.

Smartblogger uses an exit intent overlay with a cunning strategy:

image06

This popup immediately engages the reader. Instead of being presented with just one option, you get two. And one of them has to be applicable to you. At the very least, it raised your eyebrows, right?

And here’s the best part: There are two different lead magnets for the two answers.

You don’t have to copy this popup, but I hope it gets you thinking about using exit intent popups. They perform well, but you have to put the work in.

Next up is scroll-triggered scrollboxes. These are the little boxes that pop up on the lower right-hand side of the screen. Usually, these popups appear after you’ve scrolled down the page.

For example, when you scroll to the bottom of any Crazy Egg post (like this one), you’ll see this:

image00

These are great because they’re not intrusive. They take up a small amount of real estate, and they’re far less annoying than random popups that cover up half the screen.

The most important takeaway here is that popups should not distract from the user experience of your site visitors. Don’t cover up the content or make closing the popup difficult. Respect your readers.

Conclusion

You’re probably drawing in plenty of traffic.

Remember, however: what matters most is what you’re doing with that traffic.

Create an irresistible offer, and make it accessible to your visitors. People are willing to check out your offer, but it has to be worth their time. So, add as much value to your offer as possible.

I won’t lie. Conversion optimization isn’t a walk in the park. But it pays off.

And if you nail conversion, you’ll have a bunch of satisfied customers in no time.

What are your biggest problems with converting traffic?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how-4/
via My Media Pal New York

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

I’ll let you in on a little marketing secret.

In the grand scheme of things, building massive amounts of traffic doesn’t really matter. What matters is converting that traffic.

Everyone talks about building traffic. That’s fine, but it’s not the end of the story. If you don’t convert your traffic, building it is pointless.

Building traffic is like building a shopping mall. You can easily get people to come through the doors, but if you have only a few lackluster stores, none of those people will turn into customers. You have to give them a reason to stay.

I’ve seen tons of sites fail miserably because they didn’t convert their traffic. A site can have the best idea in the world, but if it doesn’t focus on conversion, it’ll flop.

Funnily enough, that’s what happened to me with my first website experience.

The first site I ever built was a job board called Advice Monkey. I spent over $5,000 to create it and hired three lousy marketing firms. In the end, I learned how to market it myself, but the site still failed because it wasn’t set up to take payments.

Had I spent less time marketing and more time optimizing the site for conversions, the site would have done much better. Sure, I probably wouldn’t have made millions, but I would’ve converted more of my traffic and made more than $0.

Take a lesson from me: don’t worry much about getting people through the doors while forgetting to build the stores.

Here’s how to take all that traffic you worked so hard to build and successfully convert it.

Getting the right mindset

I firmly believe that conversion is an attitude, not just an action. It takes focus and dedication. You have to internalize your goals until they’re second nature.

I realize this sounds a little philosophical, but stay with me. You need to see conversion as more than just a bunch of numbers. Why? If you become obsessed with converting, you’ll fail.

Here’s an example. Say you’re hyper-focused on converting. You include a few popups and some social buttons, and before long, your site looks like this:

image04

Okay, it’s probably not that bad. But you get the idea.

It’s easy to go overboard, and I get that. But as Social Triggers’s Derek Halpern points out, going too far can actually become your conversion rate’s worst enemy.

You should definitely focus on conversion, but don’t get a death grip on it. Conversion is a long-term strategy, not a short-term win.

Now that you’ve understood the conversion mindset, let’s take a look at how to convert all your traffic.

Publish the right content

If I had to pick a favorite form of marketing, it’d be content marketing.

Great content is wildly powerful. The converse is true too: horrible content is wildly destructive.

In fact, your blog can (and will) fail if you get the content wrong. If you create too much content, you’ll fail. If you create content that’s not relevant to your readers, you’ll fail.

So it’s imperative you get the content right.

First, you have to decide on the type of content you’ll provide. There are many options to choose from: blog posts, webinars, and podcasts, to name a few.

How do you know which type of content is right for you? You have to know your audience. I know my readers are looking for thorough guides, and that’s one of the many reasons I use blog posts.

On the other hand, there are people like Tim Ferriss who use podcasts as their medium of choice.

image02

Tim knows his audience loves interviews with experts, and that’s what he gives them.

The lesson: Study your audience until you know them as well as you know your friends. Find out what type of content they respond to the most.

You also have to get the length right. I’ve found that longform content works best. You might be surprised to know that 3000+ word blog posts get more traffic than shorter posts.

Make conversion easy (but not annoying)

If you want people to convert, you need to make that process easy. If your readers love your content but can’t find an easy way to sign up for your list or buy your product, you’ll lose out.

There are a few elements you have to get right if you want to boost your conversion rate:

1. Make an irresistible offer

First things first: If your offer itself doesn’t amaze your readers, you’ll get zero conversions.

To create an irresistible offer, you have to know what your readers want. Delve into your psychographics to find out what drives your audience and why they behave the way they do.

SumoMe’s blog post called “The Definitive Guide to Content Upgrades” adds a sweet offer:

image05

Everyone who’s reading this post wants to learn more about content upgrades, so SumoMe offers a free e-book. It’s specific, relevant, and valuable.

On the other hand, if your offer is not specific, relevant, or valuable, your readers will have no reason to take you up on it. Don’t beat around the bush with general offers like a cheat sheet on being a better marketer. Your offer should be targeted specifically to your readers.

When you’re working on creating an irresistible offer, make sure it’s specific, relevant, and valuable. Your offers build the foundation on which you’ll build your conversion.

2. CTAs (calls-to-action)

If your CTAs are boring, your conversion rate will be low.

One of the best ways to write a great CTA is to be specific. “Buy now” could refer to anything, but “download your free e-book” reminds the reader what they’re getting.

Your CTA needs copy that’s exciting. It should feel like you’re inviting the reader on an adventure. It should not feel like you’re selling something.

Optimizely uses a straightforward and effective CTA:

image01

There’s no hard sell here. It’s an invitation to test out the software free. Plus, it’s a breeze to fill out.

Design matters too. Your CTA needs to be highly visible so people can find it and click it. It’s so simple, right? But many blogs get this wrong.

Brian Dean from Backlinko uses a yellow box for his CTAs:

image03

The yellow box works because your eye is naturally drawn to it. For Brian, that means higher conversion rates.

Find out what your yellow box is. Don’t forget to A/B test to figure out what’s working the best (and what you should ax).

Put in the time and effort to create an eye-catching CTA that engages your readers, and you’ll be rewarded.

3. Popups

Quiz time: How are popups like Justin Beiber?

As Hunter Boyle of Aweber puts it,

You either love ‘em, or hate ‘em, but lately you see ‘em everywhere—because they still pull in big crowds.

You might find popups annoying, but they work wonders. We successfully used popups on Kissmetrics to double our conversion rate.

Popups play a vital role in converting your traffic, but you shouldn’t go overboard. By tastefully using popups, you can skyrocket your conversion rate.

First, you need to decide which type(s) of popups to use. The days of random popups are gone. Instead, opt for triggered popups.

Let’s talk about two of my favorite types of popups:

  1. exit intent overlays
  2. scroll-triggered scrollboxes.

You’re probably familiar with exit intent popups that appear when your mouse moves to close the tab. An exit intent overlay is a full-screen popup that appears when a user gets ready to leave the site.

Smartblogger uses an exit intent overlay with a cunning strategy:

image06

This popup immediately engages the reader. Instead of being presented with just one option, you get two. And one of them has to be applicable to you. At the very least, it raised your eyebrows, right?

And here’s the best part: There are two different lead magnets for the two answers.

You don’t have to copy this popup, but I hope it gets you thinking about using exit intent popups. They perform well, but you have to put the work in.

Next up is scroll-triggered scrollboxes. These are the little boxes that pop up on the lower right-hand side of the screen. Usually, these popups appear after you’ve scrolled down the page.

For example, when you scroll to the bottom of any Crazy Egg post (like this one), you’ll see this:

image00

These are great because they’re not intrusive. They take up a small amount of real estate, and they’re far less annoying than random popups that cover up half the screen.

The most important takeaway here is that popups should not distract from the user experience of your site visitors. Don’t cover up the content or make closing the popup difficult. Respect your readers.

Conclusion

You’re probably drawing in plenty of traffic.

Remember, however: what matters most is what you’re doing with that traffic.

Create an irresistible offer, and make it accessible to your visitors. People are willing to check out your offer, but it has to be worth their time. So, add as much value to your offer as possible.

I won’t lie. Conversion optimization isn’t a walk in the park. But it pays off.

And if you nail conversion, you’ll have a bunch of satisfied customers in no time.

What are your biggest problems with converting traffic?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how-3/
via My Media Pal New York

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

I’ll let you in on a little marketing secret.

In the grand scheme of things, building massive amounts of traffic doesn’t really matter. What matters is converting that traffic.

Everyone talks about building traffic. That’s fine, but it’s not the end of the story. If you don’t convert your traffic, building it is pointless.

Building traffic is like building a shopping mall. You can easily get people to come through the doors, but if you have only a few lackluster stores, none of those people will turn into customers. You have to give them a reason to stay.

I’ve seen tons of sites fail miserably because they didn’t convert their traffic. A site can have the best idea in the world, but if it doesn’t focus on conversion, it’ll flop.

Funnily enough, that’s what happened to me with my first website experience.

The first site I ever built was a job board called Advice Monkey. I spent over $5,000 to create it and hired three lousy marketing firms. In the end, I learned how to market it myself, but the site still failed because it wasn’t set up to take payments.

Had I spent less time marketing and more time optimizing the site for conversions, the site would have done much better. Sure, I probably wouldn’t have made millions, but I would’ve converted more of my traffic and made more than $0.

Take a lesson from me: don’t worry much about getting people through the doors while forgetting to build the stores.

Here’s how to take all that traffic you worked so hard to build and successfully convert it.

Getting the right mindset

I firmly believe that conversion is an attitude, not just an action. It takes focus and dedication. You have to internalize your goals until they’re second nature.

I realize this sounds a little philosophical, but stay with me. You need to see conversion as more than just a bunch of numbers. Why? If you become obsessed with converting, you’ll fail.

Here’s an example. Say you’re hyper-focused on converting. You include a few popups and some social buttons, and before long, your site looks like this:

image04

Okay, it’s probably not that bad. But you get the idea.

It’s easy to go overboard, and I get that. But as Social Triggers’s Derek Halpern points out, going too far can actually become your conversion rate’s worst enemy.

You should definitely focus on conversion, but don’t get a death grip on it. Conversion is a long-term strategy, not a short-term win.

Now that you’ve understood the conversion mindset, let’s take a look at how to convert all your traffic.

Publish the right content

If I had to pick a favorite form of marketing, it’d be content marketing.

Great content is wildly powerful. The converse is true too: horrible content is wildly destructive.

In fact, your blog can (and will) fail if you get the content wrong. If you create too much content, you’ll fail. If you create content that’s not relevant to your readers, you’ll fail.

So it’s imperative you get the content right.

First, you have to decide on the type of content you’ll provide. There are many options to choose from: blog posts, webinars, and podcasts, to name a few.

How do you know which type of content is right for you? You have to know your audience. I know my readers are looking for thorough guides, and that’s one of the many reasons I use blog posts.

On the other hand, there are people like Tim Ferriss who use podcasts as their medium of choice.

image02

Tim knows his audience loves interviews with experts, and that’s what he gives them.

The lesson: Study your audience until you know them as well as you know your friends. Find out what type of content they respond to the most.

You also have to get the length right. I’ve found that longform content works best. You might be surprised to know that 3000+ word blog posts get more traffic than shorter posts.

Make conversion easy (but not annoying)

If you want people to convert, you need to make that process easy. If your readers love your content but can’t find an easy way to sign up for your list or buy your product, you’ll lose out.

There are a few elements you have to get right if you want to boost your conversion rate:

1. Make an irresistible offer

First things first: If your offer itself doesn’t amaze your readers, you’ll get zero conversions.

To create an irresistible offer, you have to know what your readers want. Delve into your psychographics to find out what drives your audience and why they behave the way they do.

SumoMe’s blog post called “The Definitive Guide to Content Upgrades” adds a sweet offer:

image05

Everyone who’s reading this post wants to learn more about content upgrades, so SumoMe offers a free e-book. It’s specific, relevant, and valuable.

On the other hand, if your offer is not specific, relevant, or valuable, your readers will have no reason to take you up on it. Don’t beat around the bush with general offers like a cheat sheet on being a better marketer. Your offer should be targeted specifically to your readers.

When you’re working on creating an irresistible offer, make sure it’s specific, relevant, and valuable. Your offers build the foundation on which you’ll build your conversion.

2. CTAs (calls-to-action)

If your CTAs are boring, your conversion rate will be low.

One of the best ways to write a great CTA is to be specific. “Buy now” could refer to anything, but “download your free e-book” reminds the reader what they’re getting.

Your CTA needs copy that’s exciting. It should feel like you’re inviting the reader on an adventure. It should not feel like you’re selling something.

Optimizely uses a straightforward and effective CTA:

image01

There’s no hard sell here. It’s an invitation to test out the software free. Plus, it’s a breeze to fill out.

Design matters too. Your CTA needs to be highly visible so people can find it and click it. It’s so simple, right? But many blogs get this wrong.

Brian Dean from Backlinko uses a yellow box for his CTAs:

image03

The yellow box works because your eye is naturally drawn to it. For Brian, that means higher conversion rates.

Find out what your yellow box is. Don’t forget to A/B test to figure out what’s working the best (and what you should ax).

Put in the time and effort to create an eye-catching CTA that engages your readers, and you’ll be rewarded.

3. Popups

Quiz time: How are popups like Justin Beiber?

As Hunter Boyle of Aweber puts it,

You either love ‘em, or hate ‘em, but lately you see ‘em everywhere—because they still pull in big crowds.

You might find popups annoying, but they work wonders. We successfully used popups on Kissmetrics to double our conversion rate.

Popups play a vital role in converting your traffic, but you shouldn’t go overboard. By tastefully using popups, you can skyrocket your conversion rate.

First, you need to decide which type(s) of popups to use. The days of random popups are gone. Instead, opt for triggered popups.

Let’s talk about two of my favorite types of popups:

  1. exit intent overlays
  2. scroll-triggered scrollboxes.

You’re probably familiar with exit intent popups that appear when your mouse moves to close the tab. An exit intent overlay is a full-screen popup that appears when a user gets ready to leave the site.

Smartblogger uses an exit intent overlay with a cunning strategy:

image06

This popup immediately engages the reader. Instead of being presented with just one option, you get two. And one of them has to be applicable to you. At the very least, it raised your eyebrows, right?

And here’s the best part: There are two different lead magnets for the two answers.

You don’t have to copy this popup, but I hope it gets you thinking about using exit intent popups. They perform well, but you have to put the work in.

Next up is scroll-triggered scrollboxes. These are the little boxes that pop up on the lower right-hand side of the screen. Usually, these popups appear after you’ve scrolled down the page.

For example, when you scroll to the bottom of any Crazy Egg post (like this one), you’ll see this:

image00

These are great because they’re not intrusive. They take up a small amount of real estate, and they’re far less annoying than random popups that cover up half the screen.

The most important takeaway here is that popups should not distract from the user experience of your site visitors. Don’t cover up the content or make closing the popup difficult. Respect your readers.

Conclusion

You’re probably drawing in plenty of traffic.

Remember, however: what matters most is what you’re doing with that traffic.

Create an irresistible offer, and make it accessible to your visitors. People are willing to check out your offer, but it has to be worth their time. So, add as much value to your offer as possible.

I won’t lie. Conversion optimization isn’t a walk in the park. But it pays off.

And if you nail conversion, you’ll have a bunch of satisfied customers in no time.

What are your biggest problems with converting traffic?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how-2/
via My Media Pal New York

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How

I’ll let you in on a little marketing secret.

In the grand scheme of things, building massive amounts of traffic doesn’t really matter. What matters is converting that traffic.

Everyone talks about building traffic. That’s fine, but it’s not the end of the story. If you don’t convert your traffic, building it is pointless.

Building traffic is like building a shopping mall. You can easily get people to come through the doors, but if you have only a few lackluster stores, none of those people will turn into customers. You have to give them a reason to stay.

I’ve seen tons of sites fail miserably because they didn’t convert their traffic. A site can have the best idea in the world, but if it doesn’t focus on conversion, it’ll flop.

Funnily enough, that’s what happened to me with my first website experience.

The first site I ever built was a job board called Advice Monkey. I spent over $5,000 to create it and hired three lousy marketing firms. In the end, I learned how to market it myself, but the site still failed because it wasn’t set up to take payments.

Had I spent less time marketing and more time optimizing the site for conversions, the site would have done much better. Sure, I probably wouldn’t have made millions, but I would’ve converted more of my traffic and made more than $0.

Take a lesson from me: don’t worry much about getting people through the doors while forgetting to build the stores.

Here’s how to take all that traffic you worked so hard to build and successfully convert it.

Getting the right mindset

I firmly believe that conversion is an attitude, not just an action. It takes focus and dedication. You have to internalize your goals until they’re second nature.

I realize this sounds a little philosophical, but stay with me. You need to see conversion as more than just a bunch of numbers. Why? If you become obsessed with converting, you’ll fail.

Here’s an example. Say you’re hyper-focused on converting. You include a few popups and some social buttons, and before long, your site looks like this:

image04

Okay, it’s probably not that bad. But you get the idea.

It’s easy to go overboard, and I get that. But as Social Triggers’s Derek Halpern points out, going too far can actually become your conversion rate’s worst enemy.

You should definitely focus on conversion, but don’t get a death grip on it. Conversion is a long-term strategy, not a short-term win.

Now that you’ve understood the conversion mindset, let’s take a look at how to convert all your traffic.

Publish the right content

If I had to pick a favorite form of marketing, it’d be content marketing.

Great content is wildly powerful. The converse is true too: horrible content is wildly destructive.

In fact, your blog can (and will) fail if you get the content wrong. If you create too much content, you’ll fail. If you create content that’s not relevant to your readers, you’ll fail.

So it’s imperative you get the content right.

First, you have to decide on the type of content you’ll provide. There are many options to choose from: blog posts, webinars, and podcasts, to name a few.

How do you know which type of content is right for you? You have to know your audience. I know my readers are looking for thorough guides, and that’s one of the many reasons I use blog posts.

On the other hand, there are people like Tim Ferriss who use podcasts as their medium of choice.

image02

Tim knows his audience loves interviews with experts, and that’s what he gives them.

The lesson: Study your audience until you know them as well as you know your friends. Find out what type of content they respond to the most.

You also have to get the length right. I’ve found that longform content works best. You might be surprised to know that 3000+ word blog posts get more traffic than shorter posts.

Make conversion easy (but not annoying)

If you want people to convert, you need to make that process easy. If your readers love your content but can’t find an easy way to sign up for your list or buy your product, you’ll lose out.

There are a few elements you have to get right if you want to boost your conversion rate:

1. Make an irresistible offer

First things first: If your offer itself doesn’t amaze your readers, you’ll get zero conversions.

To create an irresistible offer, you have to know what your readers want. Delve into your psychographics to find out what drives your audience and why they behave the way they do.

SumoMe’s blog post called “The Definitive Guide to Content Upgrades” adds a sweet offer:

image05

Everyone who’s reading this post wants to learn more about content upgrades, so SumoMe offers a free e-book. It’s specific, relevant, and valuable.

On the other hand, if your offer is not specific, relevant, or valuable, your readers will have no reason to take you up on it. Don’t beat around the bush with general offers like a cheat sheet on being a better marketer. Your offer should be targeted specifically to your readers.

When you’re working on creating an irresistible offer, make sure it’s specific, relevant, and valuable. Your offers build the foundation on which you’ll build your conversion.

2. CTAs (calls-to-action)

If your CTAs are boring, your conversion rate will be low.

One of the best ways to write a great CTA is to be specific. “Buy now” could refer to anything, but “download your free e-book” reminds the reader what they’re getting.

Your CTA needs copy that’s exciting. It should feel like you’re inviting the reader on an adventure. It should not feel like you’re selling something.

Optimizely uses a straightforward and effective CTA:

image01

There’s no hard sell here. It’s an invitation to test out the software free. Plus, it’s a breeze to fill out.

Design matters too. Your CTA needs to be highly visible so people can find it and click it. It’s so simple, right? But many blogs get this wrong.

Brian Dean from Backlinko uses a yellow box for his CTAs:

image03

The yellow box works because your eye is naturally drawn to it. For Brian, that means higher conversion rates.

Find out what your yellow box is. Don’t forget to A/B test to figure out what’s working the best (and what you should ax).

Put in the time and effort to create an eye-catching CTA that engages your readers, and you’ll be rewarded.

3. Popups

Quiz time: How are popups like Justin Beiber?

As Hunter Boyle of Aweber puts it,

You either love ‘em, or hate ‘em, but lately you see ‘em everywhere—because they still pull in big crowds.

You might find popups annoying, but they work wonders. We successfully used popups on Kissmetrics to double our conversion rate.

Popups play a vital role in converting your traffic, but you shouldn’t go overboard. By tastefully using popups, you can skyrocket your conversion rate.

First, you need to decide which type(s) of popups to use. The days of random popups are gone. Instead, opt for triggered popups.

Let’s talk about two of my favorite types of popups:

  1. exit intent overlays
  2. scroll-triggered scrollboxes.

You’re probably familiar with exit intent popups that appear when your mouse moves to close the tab. An exit intent overlay is a full-screen popup that appears when a user gets ready to leave the site.

Smartblogger uses an exit intent overlay with a cunning strategy:

image06

This popup immediately engages the reader. Instead of being presented with just one option, you get two. And one of them has to be applicable to you. At the very least, it raised your eyebrows, right?

And here’s the best part: There are two different lead magnets for the two answers.

You don’t have to copy this popup, but I hope it gets you thinking about using exit intent popups. They perform well, but you have to put the work in.

Next up is scroll-triggered scrollboxes. These are the little boxes that pop up on the lower right-hand side of the screen. Usually, these popups appear after you’ve scrolled down the page.

For example, when you scroll to the bottom of any Crazy Egg post (like this one), you’ll see this:

image00

These are great because they’re not intrusive. They take up a small amount of real estate, and they’re far less annoying than random popups that cover up half the screen.

The most important takeaway here is that popups should not distract from the user experience of your site visitors. Don’t cover up the content or make closing the popup difficult. Respect your readers.

Conclusion

You’re probably drawing in plenty of traffic.

Remember, however: what matters most is what you’re doing with that traffic.

Create an irresistible offer, and make it accessible to your visitors. People are willing to check out your offer, but it has to be worth their time. So, add as much value to your offer as possible.

I won’t lie. Conversion optimization isn’t a walk in the park. But it pays off.

And if you nail conversion, you’ll have a bunch of satisfied customers in no time.

What are your biggest problems with converting traffic?

from Quick Sprout https://www.quicksprout.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how/
via My Media Pal

Filed under: Digital Marketing Strategy, Marketing Strategy, Online Strategy, Search Engine Optimization, SEO, SEO Strategy, SEO Tips

from SEO NYC https://mymediapal.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/stop-building-traffic-and-start-converting-it-heres-how/
via My Media Pal New York

Stop Building Traffic, and Start Converting It. Here’s How